Editor's note: This story was last updated at 10:30 p.m. on September 2, 2021. 

The remnants of Hurricane Ida, which by the time it reached Pennsylvania had weakened to a tropical depression, gave Lancaster County a solid soaking on Wednesday, spawning a tornado watch and dropping several inches of rain in some areas. 

Now, residents and business owners are cleaning up in the wake of the storm.

According to several reports as of Thursday morning, Lancaster County received between 3.5 and 8 inches of rain, National Weather Service meteorologist Matt Steinbugl said. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Wednesday's rain was the most single-day precipitation accumulation since 1999. 

As of 10:30 p.m. Thursday, 204 residents in the county are still without power.

You can check PPL's outage map here.

This story will be updated with information on rainfall, closures, traffic issues and damage as the storm moves through the region. Please send tips to and photos of the storms impact in your area to digital@lnpnews.com. Photos can also be submitted to our online gallery.

Click here for photos from throughout the county Wednesday. 

Thursday, Sept. 2

10:30 p.m.

A total of 204 residents are still without power.

4:52 p.m.

The Lancaster County Emergency Management Agency is asking residents who experienced property damage as a result of Ida to report their damage using the agency's portal.

"This portal will provide situational awareness for the county only, and is not an application for financial assistance," according to a news release. "The information submitted by the citizens of Lancaster County will assist authorities in determining eligibility for requesting Federal financial assistance from agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Small Business Administration."

That portal can be found by visiting Lancaster County Emergency Management Agency's website.

The agency is also asking citizens who incurred damage from the storm to do the following:

- Document all expenses related to the storm.

- Photograph property damages.

- Contact home and auto insurance agents regarding damages that may have occurred.

- Contact a damage mitigation company to assist with repairs.

4:34 p.m.

Aaron Freysz, 28, an industrial mechanic who rents a home along the Chiques Creek in Mounty Joy, said the creek had moved up about 20 yards from its normal bank, climbing two feet up his back wall and filling his basement with water.

“I woke up about 6 a.m. and looked outside and it was pretty high,” he said.

At 10:30 a.m. there was still three feet of water in his basement with a powerful odor of oil filling the space from the drum that had been stored there. He said his landlord was bringing a truck for the trash and a friend was bringing a water pump, but he is still worried about mold.

Flooded Basment Aaron Freysz
Aaron Freysz, 28, an industrial mechanic who rents a home along the Chiques Creek in Mounty Joy, said the creek had moved up about 20 yards from its normal bank, climbing two feet up his back wall and filling his basement with water on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021.

3:30 p.m.

Justin Lyons, 45, owner of American Bar & Grill on N Plum St said he saw more than 5 feet of water beneath the overpass by the bar yesterday.

He also said, flooding under that particular bridge has always been an issue and isn’t uncommon with heavy rains. He said when the bridge closes, people have to re-navigate to come to the bar, which he assumes affects business. Lyons said, he’s more concerned with the potential damage of personal property and lives.

“I’ve been here my whole life. I’ve seen people jump off the bridge into the water. I’ve seen countless cars get stuck in that water,” said Lyons. “My only concern really is people trying to drive through there because you’ll total your car.”

The bridge has a measuring stick underneath it that goes up to 10 ft. to measure flood waters, as floods take place under the bridge frequently. There’s also a caution sign at the entrance of the bridge that says “When flooded turn around don’t drown”.

Lyons said he’s seen water as high as 10 ft. touching the bottom of the bridge. A puddle on the right side of the bridge remains from yesterday’s flooding.

“It drains better now than it ever did… For as heavy as the rain was yesterday it’s drained out pretty good.”

3 p.m. 

As of mid-afternoon Thursday, 14 state-owned roads were closed in Lancaster County, according to Dave Thompson, a spokesman for the state Department of Transportation. Ten roads were closed due to flooding, one due to debris, one because of downed utility wires and two involved state-owned bridges that were closed as a precaution.

One bridge was on Route 23 in West Hempfield Township in the western part of the county, and the other was on Route 23 in Manheim Township, northeast of Lancaster city. The bridges were being assessed, and would either be reopened to traffic or remain closed until they can be repaired, Thompson said.

There was no major damage to the county-owned bridges, said Robert Devonshire, the director of facilities management for Lancaster County. Workers will clean off any debris built up under the bridges after the water recedes.

2:30 p.m. 

East Lampeter Township-Flooding

Along the Conestoga River in East Lampeter Township, several homes and businesses were still flooded Thursday afternoon.

Michael Dieter, who owns Waterfront Financial on Millcross Road in East Lampeter Township, had his business flooded from the overflowing Conestoga River. He was able to anticipate the flood, though, and his business will likely be up and running by next week after Labor Day.

“When you play with fire, sometimes you get burned,” said Dieter, who lives in West Lampeter Township. “When you live on the water, sometimes you get wet.”

Dieter suited up in waders and rain boots, and trekked into the water to try to get into his business to check out any flood damage.

“Just walking to work, nothing to see here,” Dieter yelled as he waded into the hip-deep water.

Flooding Sept 2 2021

Amber Quinn stands next to her mobile home in Conestoga Manor Village, that was flooded with water the Conestoga River Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021.

Amber Quinn lives on Conestoga Manor Trailer Court in West Earl Township, where she said she watched flood waters rise into her shed, vents and throughout the roadway. 

“Started looking really bad around 1:30 a.m.," she said. 

Marcus Jones took Amber's three kids to her parents house when the waters started to rise. Amber stayed behind to look after her animals. 

Flooding Sept 2 2021

Amber Quinn vaccums water from the carpet in her mobile home at Conestoga Manor Village in West Earl Township Thursday Sept. 2, 2021. The mobile home was flooded with water the Conestoga River in the early morning hours Thursday.

2:15 p.m. 

Ramona Whitcraft lives on Pitney Road near Costco Wholesale. There’s a road closure near her home due to some flooding that took place.

She lives in the house that she grew up in, so she knew there was a chance of flooding.

“I’m used to it,” said Whitcraft, referring to the frequency of flood waters invading her home.

“The flood kept me up all night because I wanted make sure the water was going down,” said Whitcraft.

She also said the flood took a toll on three areas of her basement and she was concerned if the sub pump was going to run.

“I heard a funny noise from the sub pump. So, I think I’ll need to replace them. Hopefully the flood won’t happen again in my lifetime,” said Whitcraft.

A number of the county’s campgrounds were dealing with storm damage going into a busy holiday weekend for campers. Staff at Pequea Creek Campground was cleaning up flood damage. Spring Gulch RV Resort in New Holland was dealing with downed trees and wires.

An employee at Old Mill Stream Campground next to Dutch Wonderland said that due to flooding – which has since receded -- the campground would not be taking new reservations for this weekend but would honor existing reservations.

Dutch Wonderland posted on Facebook Thursday that crews were cleaning up damage and that because of standing water and continued cleanup, Exploration Island would be closed on Friday.

"Additional attractions bordering the creek may be affected and will be evaluated throughout the day," said the post.

12:30 p.m.

The Conestoga River crested at 18.49 feet at roughly 10 a.m., marking the third highest crest in history.

12 p.m. 

Desiree Rivera was told by Lancaster City Housing Authority to stay out of her home as the water floods her backyard.

The power is turned off and since 10:30 a.m. she’s been hanging outside talking to her neighbors.

Her kids are off at school and she snapped a few pictures for them. They’ve never seen anything like this.

“I was shocked,” she said.

Her neighbor Yangkdro Lamaru thought he saw a minnow swimming in the front yard.

The couches were up off the ground. A swing in the backyard will need repainted said Nicole Lamaru.

Yangkdro Lamaru stayed up throughout the night to watch the flooding. At 4 a.m., the backyard was fine. By 5 a.m. the river was still under control. But by around 6:30, the water quickly rising.

Xiomara Ortiz, 29, came home early from work because the Lancaster City Housing Authority notified her of flooding at the property on Almanac Avenue. She’s waiting for her kids to come home at 3 now. They attend Washington Elementary which has operated at a normal schedule the last two days. It shouldn’t have though, she added.

She’s moved her belongings upstairs to protect from flooding into the house. However it looks like the water from the Conestoga River is receding here.

Everything but the couches are off the floor.

“You know what it is to buy stuff and work hard for it and lose it?”

She’s hoping the water stays away. If it doesn’t, though, she has a bag packed in case she must evacuate.

“I pray to God that this goes down,” Ortiz said.

11:10 a.m.

"Every time is just painful and stressful," Jennifer Bushy said Tuesday morning. Her and her husband, Steve Bushy, are the owners of Twin Kiss in Manheim Borough. 

She said employees were sent home early on Wednesday and the couple had to evacuate the building at 8:30 p.m. because Fruitville Pike and Route 72 were closed. 

"It's nice that the community reaches out," Jennifer Bushy said. They opened on time on Thursday, after mopping, squeegeeing and sanitizing through the morning.  

11:05 a.m.

Tom Hunter, manager at Gilbert’s Automotive, and owner Jerry Gilbert have been at their business on Pitney Road for 50 years. They have seen their share of flooding in that time, but they said it’s still not something they’re used to in the wake of Ida.

“It’s a mess. It’s devastating,” Hunter said.

Someone left a blue Jeep at the business sometime Thursday morning and left the keys since there wasn't time to move it before the water rose.

By about 10 a.m., water had risen to above the Jeep’s wheel wells.

10:30 a.m.

A total of 2,117 residence in Lancaster County are still without power, according to PPL's outage map.

10:24 a.m.

The Conestoga River is now at 18.49 feet.

10:20 a.m.

Michael Abbot, the store manager of the Weis Market near Pitney Road and Old Philadelphia Pike, is letting nearby businesses use his store's parking lot. Most of the businesses in the area are auto mechanics or detailing shops.

“We’re all in this together. We’re a community," he said. "This is the worst I’ve ever seen it.”

Scott Behmer, who lives on Susan Avenue not far from the Conestoga River, said he got four inches of rain in his basement and that he usually sees flooding there and in his backyard when it rains hard.

He tried to stay ahead of the rising waters and move some of his things, but to no avail.

“I got fed up and went to bed," he said. "I knew there was nothing else I could do. I just had to ride the storm out.”

9:51 a.m.

The Conestoga River is now at 18.46 feet.

9:30 a.m.

The Conestoga River is now at 18.41 feet, marking the third highest crest.

9:28 a.m.

Noah Santiago owns Pitney Auto Detailing, which is on the eastern bank of the Conestoga River on Pitney Road near Lincoln Highway.

“It sucks because now we can’t work for a couple days until it gets all cleaned out," he said. "That’s a lot of work to do. Basically have to pressure wash the whole inside of the building. We didn’t know that it was gonna be this bad.” 

8:53 a.m. 

The Conestoga River is currently at 18.1 feet, making it the fourth highest crest since 1942, according to National Weather Service records. 

7:09 a.m.

PPL's outage map reports 2,651 residents are still without power. A number of roadways in the county are closed as a result of flooding, including a large section of Route 222.

Manheim Township Police say the road is closed due to the Cocalico Creek flooding between Manheim and West Earl townships. All southbound traffic must exit in Brownstown, and all northbound traffic must exit at Oregon Pike. The road is expected to remain closed for hours.


Wednesday

10:02 p.m.

PPL's outage map indicates that 7,363 customers are without power. Many are in the area just northwest of Lancaster city, with another large number reported in the Honey Brook area.

9:58 p.m.

The tornado watch issued for Lancaster County and other portions of Pennsylvania has expired.

8:38 p.m.

A person was rescued by firefighters from their vehicle which was stuck in high water on McGovernville Road north of Harrisburg Pike in East Hempfield Township around 7:15 p.m.

Another vehicle, a pickup truck, was stranded in high water next to Stauffer of Kissel Hill at 301 Rohrerstown Road, also in East Hempfield Township, around 5:20 p.m. Police eventually closed Rohrerstown Road between Noll Drive and Embassy Drive.

7:16 p.m.

The Conestoga Creek flooded at Mariette Avenue in Lancaster Township near the East Hempfield Township line, resulting in the road being closed on both sides.

6:07 p.m.

The driver of a Toyota Sienna was unable to drive through a water covered road near Erbs Quarry Road and Woodcrest Avenue in Warwick Township at 3:03 p.m., Northern Lancaster County Regional police said in a news release. First responders were able to rescue the driver, who was uninjured. The vehicle was recovered by a towing company.

Trees and wires blocked the 1200 block of Forest Hill Road in Clay Township around 4:20 p.m., blocking the road, police said.

Water covered at least six roads in Clay Township, 12 roads in Penn Township and four roads in Warwick Township, causing them to be barricaded and closed before 7:15 p.m., police said.

In Lititz, the 300 block of Cardinal Road, 300 block of East New Street, 400 block of East Front Street and 400 block of Woodcrest Avenue were closed due to high water levels on the road.

5:52 p.m.

Nearly 4,000 customers in Lancaster County were without power on Wednesday evening. PPL's outage map showed 3,992 customers with outages. Nearly 2,000 -- 1,867 -- customers near New Holland were without power, with repairs expected by 2 a.m. Thursday. Another 554 near Mountville were unlikely to have power restored until midnight, and several hundred customers in the northern part of the county were also in the dark. 

Click here for PPL's outage map. Click here to report an outage. 

5:27 p.m.

Pole downed off of 72

Pole downed off Route 72.

Chiques Creek was rising across from Twin Kiss eatery in Manheim, where general manager Mark Murr and staff had lifted everything off the floors -- and at lest four feet off the ground -- the day before.
 
A pole was down near the Pennsylvania Turnpike, near the Penns Woods motel off Route 72. 

4:51 p.m.

A tree branch in the roadway has prompted police to block traffic from entering South West End Avenue between Edgewood Avenue and First Street.

4:43 p.m.

Lititz Springs Park is experiencing some flash flooding.

3:40 p.m. 

A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued in Lancaster County. 

Some minor flooding is occurring along Route 72 near Route 30 in Manheim Township. Parts of Route 72 have been shut down as a result. 

2:45 p.m. 

2:26 p.m.

Flooding is reported in Lititz Springs Park in Lititz

Lititz Springs Park, Tropical Depression Ida

Tim Charles, left, with his daughter, Lydia Charles, 12, and son, Colin Charles, 9, taking a stroll through a flooded Lititz Springs Park during heavy rain on Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021.

2:11 p.m.

Flooding is reported on Wabank Road off Hershey Avenue in Lancaster city.

2:00 p.m. 

Lancaster, York and Adams counties are under a tornado watch issued by the National Weather Service at 12:40 p.m. and is in effect until 1 p.m. today. 

1:45 p.m. 

PPL crews repair power lines in the 1000 block of Columbia Avenue in Lancaster Township. Lights have been out on Columbia Avenue at President Avenue and at Abbeyville Road since 11 a.m. The light at Columbia Avenue and West End Avenue, however, is working again.

1:00 p.m.

Western parts of Lancaster County toward Elizabethtown Borough and Manheim Township received 2 to 3 inches of rain as of 1 p.m., according to abc27 meteorologist Adis Juklo. The eastern side of Lancaster toward Quarryville Borough saw less rainfall with an accumulation of one inch as of 1 p.m.

12: 15 p.m. 

Along with a flash flood watch, a flash flood warning has been issued for several counties in central Pennsylvania including Lancaster, Dauphin, York and Lebanon. A flash flood watch is issued when conditions are favorable for flooding. A flood warning is issued when flooding is imminent or occurring. 

12:08 p.m.

Millersville University announced that it will close at 1 p.m. "due to heavy rain." 

11:30 a.m. 

Today Pennsylvania is under a rare four out of four level high risk day for flash flooding meaning one to two months of rain could fall in just 24 hours, said Jeff Jumper, State Meteorologist for the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency during a meeting from the organization. This is one of only 13 of such severity to be issued since 2010. 

11:18 a.m.

More than 450 customers are without power in Lancaster, mostly just west of the city along Lincoln Highway and the surrounding area. PPL said that weather caused the outage and estimates it should be repaired by 4:30 p.m.

Downed power lines were also reported down in the 1000 block of Columbia Avenue in Lancaster Township. Traffic lights are out on Columbia Avenue at West End Avenue, President Avenue and Abbeyville Road.

Click here for the PPL outage map. 

11:00 a.m. 

The Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency is holding a conference on the weather impacts of Hurricane Ida. Watch it live here. 

9:15 a.m. 

Governor Tom Wolf tweeted that he signed a proclamation of disaster emergency last night, which allows emergency preparedness teams to provide support during the storm and in its aftermath. 

9:00 a.m. 

Lancaster city has received nearly an inch of rain so far Wednesday morning. As of 9 a.m., 0.87 inches of rain had accumulated, according to Lancaster City Water Works. 

7:45 a.m.

As of 7:45 a.m., no storm or weather-related damages have been reported to Lancaster County-Wide Communications. 

A section of Route 30 is closed, but not due to flooding. A dump truck rolled over and spilled its load

6:30 a.m.

Rain is falling in Lancaster County as the remnants of Hurricane Ida move through central Pennsylvania. No traffic reports or any other issues are being reported so far.


Related:

Live cameras: Road conditions across Lancaster County

School closings and delays

Map: Real-time traffic flow

[3:04 PM] Stalnecker, Ashley
Desiree Rivera was told by Lancaster City Housing Authority to stay out of her home as the water floods her backyard. The power is turned off and since 10:30 a.m. she’s been hanging outside talking to her neighbors. Her kids are off at school and she snapped a few pictures for them. They’ve never seen anything like this. “I was shocked,” she said. Her neighbor Yangkdro Lamaru thought he saw a minnow swimming in the front yard. The couches were up off the ground. A swing in the backyard will need repainted said Nicole Lamaru. Yangkdro Lamaru stayed up throughout the night to watch the flooding. At 4 a.m., the backyard was fine. By 5 a.m. the river was still under control. But by around 6:30, the water quickly rising.
[3:05 PM] Stalnecker, Ashley
And you can use those stills. I have more that I just posted to Twitter too if you'd like to use them. 
[3:05 PM] Stalnecker, Ashley
Xiomara Ortiz, 29, came home early from work because the Lancaster City Housing Authority notified her of flooding at the property on Almanac Avenue. She’s waiting for her kids to come home at 3 now. They attend Washington Elementary which has operated at a normal schedule the last two days. It shouldn’t have though, she added. She’s moved her belongings upstairs to protect from flooding into the house. However it looks like the water from the Conestoga River is receding here. Everything but the couches are off the floor. “You know what it is to buy stuff and work hard for it and lose it?” She’s hoping the water stays away. If it doesn’t, though, she has a bag packed in case she must evacuate. “I pray to God that this goes down,” Ortiz said.

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