Update, 9 p.m.: A two-part winter storm brought much of Lancaster County to a halt this week, as schools closed two consecutive days and many motorists smartly stayed off the roads.

Snow. Sleet. Ice. Rain. Freezing rain. We’ve seen it all over the past two days. Here’s what you may have missed.

Snowfall/rain totals

Lancaster County got around 3 inches of snow from Sunday to Tuesday, with most of it falling Monday morning, according to the National Weather Service.

Tuesday consisted of mostly rain and freezing rain, as temperatures hovered around freezing for most of the day. Just over a half-inch of rain fell Tuesday, according to Millersville University’s Weather Information Center.

Crashes/traffic jams

The speed limit was restricted to 45 mph on major Lancaster County roads: routes 283, 30, 222, 30 and 340, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

As of 9 p.m., Lancaster County-Wide Communications received reports of 45 vehicle accidents Tuesday, 24 of which happened between 7 a.m. and noon.

When sleet started falling, roads were “pretty slick,” according to Scott Tanguy, manager of the PennDOT’s maintenance center in Lancaster County.

“For the most part, everything is wet now,” Tanguy said just before noon. PennDOT trucks started spreading material overnight and continued as freezing rain fell, he said.

Motorists said main roads were mostly wet and other roads icy or slushy.

Forecast for remainder of week

Millersville University meteorologist Eric Horst said untreated surfaces were likely to refreeze as chilly temperatures extended through Tuesday night. He expected the rain to cease around 1 a.m. today.

A PennDOT crew will be ready early Wednesday to treat any problem areas from the Tuesday night freeze, Tanguy said.

Wednesday should be windy and cool with the sun pushing temperatures to the mid- to upper-30s, Horst said.

Expect milder conditions in the 40s Thursday and Friday before two more winter threats this weekend, he said.

Light snow is possible Saturday morning, Horst said, and a potentially significant winter storm may arrive Sunday.


Update, 3 p.m.: Chilly rain continues to fall in Lancaster County.

Millersville University's weather center recorded a temperature of 31 degrees at 3 p.m. 

The National Weather Service received reports of a tenth to a quarter of an inch of freezing rain in Lancaster County today, according to meteorologist Matt Steinbugl.

A tractor-trailer crash on the turnpike near Denver was likely weather-related, an official said. The westbound lanes are shut down, and traffic is being rerouted. 

Temperatures are expected to tick upwards into the evening, according to forecasts.

Weather service meteorologist Steinbugl said there could be remaining icy spots on roads through the day.

"Still be on the lookout (while driving)," Steinbugl said.


Update, noon: After a sleet-filled morning, temperatures are creeping above freezing in Lancaster County.

Lancaster County Wide Communications received reports of 24 vehicle accidents from 7 a.m. to noon. 

When sleet started falling, roads were "pretty slick," according to Scott Tanguy, manager of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation's maintenance center in Lancaster County.

Millersville University's Weather Information Center recorded just under 0.3 inches of precipitation from 7 a.m. to noon.

"For the most part, everything is wet now," Tanguy said just before noon, adding there are a few isolated icy spots.

PennDOT trucks started spreading material overnight and continued as freezing rain fell, he said.

MU weather center director Eric Horst said mostly plain rain is likely through the afternoon due to temperatures rising above freezing and solar radiation through the clouds.

Temperatures might hover around freezing overnight, and untreated surfaces may refreeze, Horst said.

Horst said Wednesday should be windy and cool. Thursday and Friday should be milder with temperatures in the 40s.

Then there are two more winter threats: possible light snow Saturday morning and a more significant snow Sunday, he said.


Tuesday morning: After little snow overnight, forecasters warn of an icy mix through the morning in Lancaster County.

The speed limit has been restricted to 45 mph on major Lancaster County roads: routes 283, 30, 222, 30 and 340, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 

Millersville University meteorologist Eric Horst said in a tweet early Tuesday that the brunt of the storm will hit between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m.

The 16 public Lancaster County school districts announced closures for the day.

Precipitation should resume as an icy mix and transition to mainly freezing rain into midday, Horst said. Untreated surfaces could get slick.

"Be careful out there!" Horst said.

A winter storm warning from the National Weather Service is in effect through 4 p.m.

The warning says dangerous travel, power outages and tree damage are likely due to ice. Ice accumulation around a tenth of an inch is possible.

Temperatures are expected to rise slowly during the day. The icy mix should change to plain rain when temperatures get past freezing.

AccuWeather forecasts temperatures around 32 through midmorning, slowly rising to the mid-30s by midday and getting to the upper 30s by the evening.