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Before she was stabbed to death, Lindy Sue Biechler was putting away groceries in her Manor Township apartment.

Biechler, 19, had spent the day on Dec. 5, 1975, tying large, satin ribbons around poinsettia plants at the flower shop where she worked. 

She left around 5:15 p.m., stopped at her husband's workplace to pick up his paycheck, cashed the check and then went grocery shopping. She filled four bags with $46 worth of groceries at John Herr's Village Market and went home.

Investigators believe a man entered her first-floor apartment soon after, around 6:30 or 7 p.m. He tried to sexually assault her and stabbed her 19 times. Her aunt and uncle found her at 8:42 p.m. with a butcher knife left in her neck, according to previous news reports

Lindy Sue Biechler

Lindy Sue Biechler in a snapshot taken by her husband, Phil.

There were no signs of a forced entry. Blood was splattered on the floors and walls inside the apartment. A lamp had fallen from an end table. The groceries were on the kitchen table. The knife, with an 8-inch blade, had been hanging on the wall in her kitchen.

The killer left behind was a large footprint in blood in the kitchen. Early on investigators theorized that an intruder followed Biechler as she went inside or knocked on the door while she put them away. 

Biechler had told family and friends she thought someone was watching and following her the weeks before she was killed. Investigators believed the killer was a man who knew her.

But the case, one of Lancaster County's most notorious murders, has remained unsolved.

Here's a timeline of key moments in the case based on news records.


Lindy Biechler homicide

Lindy Biechler's Spring Manor apartment building.

Dec. 5, 1975: Lindy Sue Biechler, 19, is found stabbed to death in her Spring Manor apartment on Kloss Drive near Millersville.

Dec. 8, 1975: The Lancaster New Era reports that Manor Township police find a male's footprint in the kitchen and determine the killer was likely a male.

Dec. 9, 1975: The Intelligencer Journal reports that police ask for information on a car double-parked near the Spring Manor apartments between 7 and 8:40 p.m. The car's headlights were on. Police thought it might at least be a witness. A New Era report Dec. 10 describes the car as dark-colored, standard size American made that was seen parked parallel to the sidewalk at Kloss Drive around the time of the murder.


Mon, Dec 8, 1975 – 1 · Lancaster New Era (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

Dec. 9, 1975: The Intelligencer Journal reports that police ask for information on a car double-parked near the Spring Manor apartments between 7 and 8:40 p.m. The car's headlights were on. Police thought it might at least be a witness. A New Era report Dec. 10 describes the car as dark-colored, standard size American made that was seen parked parallel to the sidewalk at Kloss Drive around the time of the murder.

Dec. 10, 1975.: The New Era reports that Manor Township police ruled Biechler's husband out as a suspect because he was working when the murder happened. The number of people interviewed approaches 100, police say.

Dec. 16, 1975: The Intelligencer Journal reports that Lancaster County District Attorney D. Richard Eckman decides to step up the investigation by adding additional state police personnel.

Feb. 7, 1976: The Intelligencer Journal reports police say they have interviewed between 250 and 300 people. They believe the killer is in the Lancaster area.

March 5, 1976: Mary Schinzing, 43, is stabbed to death in her Columbia home. Investigators begin to probe similarities between her death and Biechler’s.

March 16, 1976: Kenneth Dale Arndt, 33, of Columbia, is charged with killing Schinzing. Police say they don't believe he was involved in Biechler's death.



Dec. 26, 1976: Biechler's family discovers her tombstone at Boehm's United Methodist Church in Pequea Township has been vandalized. The stone was sprayed with red paint, chipped and nicked. Damage was done sometime since the end of November.

Jan. 5, 1977: Manor Township police receive a letter marked "Urgent." It is written as if it is from the man who stabbed Biechler and vandalized her tombstone. Police consider the letter a hoax and decide not to publish it.

Oct. 30, 1982: Police consider questioning mass murderer Gerald Eugene Stano about Biechler's murder. Stano was arrested in April in Florida and claimed responsibility for murdering at least 37 women. His father lived in East Hempfield Township at the time of Biechler's murder. Police circulate photos of Stano but don't find anyone who recognizes him, according to a New Era report.

Jan. 4, 1983: The New Era reports that Manor Township police all but rule out Stano as Biechler's killer.

Jan. 18, 1984: The Intelligencer Journal reports that the district attorney's office paid $2,000 for two California-based psychics to evaluate Biechler's case in 1981 or 1982. The psychics said it was their impression that Biechler's assailant had a tattoo on his arm and had dark or olive skin and dark or brown hair and eyes. County detective Paul Wagner says the psychics may have been describing Mark Capollupo, who had been charged with sexual assaults in Lancaster County in 1975 and was later shot and killed by a guard during an escape attempt at Lancaster County Prison. Capollupo fit the psychics’ description, but he had been ruled out as a suspect. He was working when Biechler was stabbed.

April 6, 1984: Wagner and a state trooper travel to interview someone out-of-state with a possible link to Biechler's murder, the Intelligencer Journal reports. District Attorney Henry S. Kenderine Jr. says the interview did not lead to anything.

April 2, 1989: The Sunday News reports that investigators tried to use new DNA technology to analyze a spot of dried blood suspected of belonging to Biechler or her murderer, but the sample could not be analyzed.

June 1992: Detective Joseph P. Geesey retires as head detective of Lancaster city police and is hired as a county detective to concentrate on unsolved murders. Biechler's death is one of the first.

Biechler letter

This is the text of a letter sent to police in 1977.

Dec. 6, 2000: Law enforcement decide to release the letter sent to Manor Township a year after Biechler's murder. A behavioral specialist with the FBI tells a Lancaster New Era reporter that it's unlikely the killer wrote the letter. The writer possibly had an indirect or secondary role, the specialist says.

June 16, 2006: LNP reports that Lancaster County detectives present Biechler's case to the Vidocq Society, a group of 50 crime experts that meets monthly to hear unsolved cases and offer insights to investigators. 

Dec. 3, 2007: The New Era reports that Mike Little, Biechler's half-brother, puts up a billboard on Route 30 near Route 283 asking for tips about her murder.

Billboard spurs tips on unsolved murders

This is Web site image of billboard along Route 30.

June 26, 2018: Police charge Raymond "DJ Freez" Rowe, 49, with the rape and murder of Christy Mirack, a 25-year-old schoolteacher who was killed Dec. 21, 1992.

July 16, 2018: LNP reports that Philip D. Biechler, Biechler's husband at the time of her death, wonders if the technology used to arrest Mirack's killer could be used to find the person who killed his late wife.

Sept. 5, 2019: Investigators release two images, generated from DNA at the 1975 murder scene, of what the killer might have looked like at age 25 and age 65.

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