225 front pages

As part of our 225th anniversary celebration, LNP is sharing 52 front pages from throughout its history in a weekly series.

Editor's note: Ask An Editor is an occasional column celebrating LNP’s 225th anniversary. Send Ask An Editor questions to Lori Goodlin, content and production editor, at lgoodlin@lnpnews.com.

About the 52 front pages

Q: Why can’t the print of the old newspaper pages that LNP is using to celebrate its anniversary year in the print editions be large enough to actually read?

I know there are some reprints at the bottom of the pages, but it would be really fun to read whole articles.


We asked copy editor Eden Cohen to answer.

A: As part of our 225th anniversary celebration, LNP is sharing 52 front pages from throughout its history in a weekly series.

The images are meant to show how drastically our paper has changed visually over the decades. With minuscule text, wide pages and a lack of photos or prominent headlines, front pages from the 1800s contrast sharply with today’s A1.

These differences are also why it’s logistically challenging for you to make out individual stories, since enlarging the photos — taken of physical newspapers still in our vault — big enough to make the text legible would mean sacrificing the overall view.

To satisfy both interests, we’ve uploaded PDF files of the pages to LancasterOnline.com/LancLife/225. From there, readers can zoom to their hearts’ content.

Lancaster residents will have another chance at a close look in June, when an exhibit on the history of news in Lancaster County is to open at LancasterHistory’s main hub at 230 N. President Ave. The exhibit will feature large posters of the front pages.


For more Ask An Editor and 225th anniversary coverage: 

Ask An Editor: Why was the daily list of Deaths Reported moved in the newspaper?
Ask An Editor: Why has the front page strayed from 'Always Lancaster' content?
Ask An Editor: Why are there so many editorials from papers 'with a very strong, liberal slant'?
Over 225 years, LNP has evolved to serve Lancaster County [column]
From 1794's Lancaster Journal to now, a look at 225 years of journalism in Lancaster County [timeline]