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 A 1960's wall of photos of protestors about war and peace is pictured from "Lancaster in the '60s," an exhibit about four centuries of Lancaster history, covering the 1660s, 1760s, 1860s and the 1960s at LancasterHistory.

Hey Lancastrians!

Just how much do you really know about this town you call home?

LancasterHistory is opening an exhibit Friday that will illuminate key decades in the city’s history, and also offer visitors a chance to speculate about its future.

Through historic artifacts and archival materials, “Lancaster in the ‘60s’’ examines our town in the 1660s, 1760s, 1860s and 1960s.

According to promotional materials, highlights and topics include:

1660s

Everyday life for Native American tribes in the Susquehanna Valley, the persecution of religious groups within Europe that will impact early immigration patterns to Lancaster County, and a quest for religious tolerance that will later lead people to settle in Pennsylvania.

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A new logo about "Lancaster in the '60s" an exhibit about four centuries of Lancaster history covering the 1660s, 1760s, 1860s and the 1960s at LancasterHistory.

1760s: Life in Lancaster on the frontier, the tragic massacre of the Conestoga Indians, and the arrival of German and English refugees escaping religious persecution.

1860s: The final months of James Buchanan's presidency, the Civil War, the political advocacy of Thaddeus Stevens, and the growing impact of media, consumerism, and factories.

1960s: The Civil Rights Movement, urban renewal in Lancaster County, the Vietnam War, Franklin & Marshall College shifts to co-education, the Clair Brothers put Lancaster on the music industry map, and Armstrong World Industries begins to “floor America.”

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"Lancaster in the '60s" exhibit about four centuries of Lancaster history covers the 1660s, 1760s, 1860s and the 1960s at LancasterHistory. Women's rights were a large part of the 1960's, including colleges which became co-ed, access to birth control, and workforces that adopted the 1964 Civil Rights Act, making it illegal to discriminate based on gender.

The exhibit is free on opening day (but donations will be gratefully accepted). Afterwards, it will be included in the regular admission of $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and students, $8 for children 10-16, free for children under 10.

The LancasterHistory campus is at 230 N. President Ave. For details, visit lancasterhistory.org.