Clio Health building

This is the $45 million Clio Health Lancaster medical building at the former Lancaster Stockyards along Marshall Avenue, in early April 2018.

The uncertain future of a health care facility at the former Lancaster Stockyards property hasn’t cleared up much.

Two months after Clio Health said a task force was due to produce a revised business plan, CEO Steve Dailey issued a vague statement saying its core mission remained the same but unspecified revisions had been made to its vision statement.

The closest the statement got to specifics was saying that the company’s next steps “focus on securing our anchor tenants centered around” surgery, primary care, imaging labs, physical therapy, and dental and vision services.

Company spokesman Scott Kreider initially offered to field follow-up questions, but upon receiving them said in an email that the company couldn’t comment further “in light of developments related to positive ongoing confidential conversations.”

The unanswered questions included whether the company is still looking to open the facility by September 2019; if any clients or partners have signed up yet; and whether Clio Health Lancaster moving forward is dependent on the success of the Aspire Ventures Precision Medicine Fund.

Clio parent company Aspire Ventures set up the fund with Lancaster General Health in April to raise $300 million to accelerate innovation for personalized devices and medical practices. Asked then if any of the fund’s money would go to Clio, a spokeswoman said the fund’s allocations hadn’t been set.

The $45 million Clio Health Lancaster facility was originally supposed to open this spring, with 140 employees and an emphasis on using high-tech innovations to transform the health care experience.

But work on the 144,000-square-foot building on the northern edge of Lancaster city appeared to slow drastically as the exterior neared completion, and the former CEOs of Clio Health and Clio Health Lancaster were terminated at the beginning of this year.